Balance And VNG Testing Specialist

Family Medicine and Acute Care of Sandhills

Primary Care Practice located in Cameron, NC

If you think you have a balance disorder, it’s important to be checked by a doctor. Balance disorders can cause falls resulting in serious injuries. The team at Family Medicine and Acute Care of Sandhills located in Cameron, North Carolina, is prepared to help you with your balance problems and help you find solutions. The team offers VNG testing, also called videonystagmography, to diagnose the cause of your balance disorder. The test checks the balance system in the inner ear to diagnose abnormalities. Call the office or schedule an appointment online today to learn more about how Family Medicine and Acute Care of Sandhills can help with balance disorders and VNG testing.

Balance and VNG Testing Q & A

What are balance disorders?

Many balance disorders are caused by problems in the inner ear. The labyrinth is the part of the inner ear that controls balance. If it becomes infected or swollen, it can cause you to suffer from vertigo and balance problems. This condition is known as labyrinthitis. Bacterial infections and other viral infections can also cause labyrinthitis. Symptoms of balance disorders may include:

  • Dizziness
  • Vertigo
  • Feeling of falling
  • Lightheadedness
  • Floating sensation
  • Blurred vision
  • Confusion

Symptoms may come and go or only be present for a brief moment. The team at Family Medicine and Acute Care of Sandhills helps you overcome these symptoms by diagnosing the cause and providing treatment options.

What is VNG testing?

The VNG device tests the inner ear to see if it is the root of your imbalance problem. The team at Family Medicine and Acute Care of Sandhills places a set of goggles over your eyes. They then place sticker electrodes around your face to track eye movements and patterns.

Before the test, you should avoid alcohol, caffeine, contact lenses, and mascara. Some medication including antihistamines, diuretics, and other medication such as pain medication, sedatives, antidepressants, or tranquilizers, may cause an inaccurate reading. It’s important to discuss with your doctor your current medication regime, and it’s important to never stop taking medication without the consent of your doctor.

What happens during the VNG test?

The VNG test breaks down into four different parts. The test takes about an hour, and results can help determine appropriate treatment options.

Sensory organization testing

You will be asked to be in specific positions with your eyes closed at times and open at other times. This part of the test helps determine how your sensory system works.

Ocular motor testing

You follow a light inside the goggles, which evaluates your ocular motor system. This may make you slightly dizzy.

Positional testing

The team asks you to perform various movements. This portion of the test may make you feel dizzy and give you vertigo if your balance disorder is caused by movement.

Caloric testing

This part of the test is arguably the most important part. The device blows air into your ear and is set for one minute. The device then monitors and tracks your eye movements. This portion of the test causes vertigo and dizziness for most patients.

The team is dedicated to helping you find both the cause and solutions for your balance problems. Call the Family Medicine and Acute Care of Sandhills or schedule an appointment online today to learn more about balance disorders and VNG testing.